Reason 3/5 Why Making the Atlanta Public School Teachers Felons Won’t Make a Difference:

The Tests Dumb down the System in General

Go back to the pretest vs. post test notion of evaluating teachers. If a child can ace a pretest, why should he take the class? Great question. But historically all tests with great intentions, after a while, are revised to become easier and easier as ”too many” children fail them. Even the SAT in the last years has become easier by degrees. First the College Board rid themselves of the dreaded analogies. More recently they took out the tough vocabulary. Instead of words like Alacrity and Beneficent. . .we now test words like flush and wholesome. So year after year test writers are asked to figure out where the failure point is. Often illiterate is the cut off point. On high school writing exams, the kid who fails truly cannot write an intelligible sentence. ANYthing above that can pass. So earning a passing score, and even a high score is then not a sign of excellence.

Thus, as we ease failing points in order to include more kids in the passing range, as we adjust the test to be more passable, we are also lowering our standards. The tests I used to design for my own students 15 years ago were ten times harder and more demanding than the standardized tests teachers must give today as final exams. AND GUESS WHAT? My kids used to do really well on them. The kids earning an A today, think they are on par with kids earning A’s years ago, and they aren’t. Even worse, Teachers today spend more time “teaching to the test” for tests that measure irrelevant, low level skills.  Teaching to the test might be fine if the test were valuable.

Yes, you can argue that if a kid is failing this, then we really need to target teachers and education. But I respond that as kids recognize the irrelevance of an “all-defining” test, they are less inspired, less motivated to learn. We’ve created a nasty cycle.

PLUS, more parents are pushing to allow their kids who earn an A or even a B on a pretest to skip the class completely. School Boards like that idea; it could save tons of money.

I understand that. But can a 100 question multiple choice test with invalid questions that have been designed to get the most kids through the test really be the same as practicing essay writing and reading challenging text all year?   Do we really want a generation of kids coming out of high school this way? And if your argument is that this is fine with you, why in the world are you worried about the standards that testing is supposed to support? Why in the world do you care if APS cheated?